Death rarely comes as a surprise in aged care, many of the staff are used to it by now, however, it can still be quite a shock for the families and other loved ones.

If there were a way to predict the death before the last few moments, it may give the family – as well as staff – time to comfort the resident and receive closure themselves.

In something that sounds more fiction than fact, it’s been found that some cats are able to predict death.

Somehow these cats are able to sense something that the staff cannot see, something that is beyond the nurses and carers’ training and skills.

Cats, like other animals, are very intuitive, and their eyesight and sense of smell are more acute than humans.

Because cats rely primarily on body language to communicate with one another, they must be attuned to biological and behavioural changes in the other animals around them.

Research would suggest that the cats are able to smell the chemical changes that begin to occur just a mere hours before a person passes away.

What if these cats could be utilised as a part of the “care service” in aged or palliative care? Or if researchers could use find a way to harness the cat’s skill to create technology that could help predict imminent death.

By no means are these cats trained to sense or behave in such a way. And it should be noted that not all cats can “predict death”.

Oscar The Cat

The most famous case of this is seen in Oscar the cat – a cat that no one wanted to see in their room, because he could predict who was going to die next.

Oscar has been living in Steere House Nursing and Rehabilitation Center in Providence, Rhode Island since 2005.

Staff found that as he would roam around the pet friendly facility, he would end up napping next to terminally ill residents that would later die within the next few hours.

The staff at the facility believed that Oscar would nap near them in an attempt to comfort them in their last moments. And if he was sent out of the room, he would either sit by the door purring, or scratch at it to be let back in. 

“I first heard about him from the nurses on the unit,” says Dr David M. Dosa, a geriatrician who cares for the elderly at the nursing home.

“It came to light that he was spending time with patients as they were becoming terminal.”

Dr Dosa would go on to have his essay about Oscar published in The New England Journal of Medicine.

Oscar’s presence has been a comfort to many family members, as well as help alert the staff to let family members know that their loved one may be nearing death.

Oscar has been so accurate, that by 2018 he’d predicted approximately 100 resident’s deaths.

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