Getting Older
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Caroline Egan
Caroline Egan Feb 14, 2019

Pet support, manicures and massages: Surprising home care services you may not know about

Many older Australian wish to remain living at home for as long as they can. For many, it’s important they remain in their local communities, where they have friends and family nearby, they know their neighbours, and are familiar with the nearby facilities. The familiarity of home can also be reassuring to older people. The feeling of being immersed in a home they’ve created, a reflection of their life journey and rich with memories, can also be hugely comforting. With...
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My Mother Was Murdered In An Aged Care Facility

My name is Charli Maree Darragh and I am the daughter of a victim of the current aged care system. My mother Marie Terese Darragh was murdered in her sleep by a nurse at the St Andrews Nursing Village in Ballina NSW back in 2014, and I am not ashamed to admit that I’m not ‘over it,’ because I probably never will be. My mother’s killer was a woman by the name of Megan Haines who started her career...
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Matiu Bush
Matiu Bush Feb 7, 2019

Conversation-as-Therapy pin monitors social interactions

The Australian population is getting older, living longer – and for some, getting lonelier. It’s predicted that households of one will rise from 2.1 million in 2011 to a staggering 3.4 million in 2036. Care services are seeing an increased demand for aged care that works with older people, supporting them to keep independent and socially connected in their own homes. Lonely and socially isolated older Australians are a widely distributed, often secluded population. As a group, it’s...
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Meet Lauren, Our Founder

I’m so glad you made it to HelloCare our digital magazine. We bring you the very best information around the world from Aged Care industry experts and providing a voice for the elderly community. We publish topics that we believe our audience want to read such as tips to staying healthy, support for caregivers & professionals, dementia and overall wellbeing. If you want to see more of something then please email me, as I’m here to make HelloCare exactly what you want to read about. lauren_sign
Getting Older
old lady waiting for seat
Jakob Neeland
Jakob Neeland Feb 14, 2019

Mind Your Manners – A Refresher Course For Millennials In Respecting The Elderly

A photo showing an elderly woman standing hunched over on a Sydney train while three young commuters sit down in front of her has been causing quite a stir on the internet lately. The picture, shows an obviously frail and physically limited older woman standing and clutching on to a pole to maintain her balance on a crowded Sydney train, while four young individuals sit comfortably, either ignoring her or too engrossed with their mobile phones to care. The photo...
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Physical restraint doesn’t protect patients – there are better alternatives

It’s an uncomfortable image to consider: an elderly person – perhaps somebody you know – physically restrained. Maybe an aged care resident deemed likely to fall has been bound to his chair using wrist restraints; or someone with dementia acting aggressively has been confined to her bed by straps and rails. These scenarios remain a reality in Australia. Despite joining the global trend to promote a “restraint free” model, Australia is one of several high income countries continuing to employ...
5 comments
 
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Caroline Egan
Caroline Egan Feb 14, 2019

Pet support, manicures and massages: Surprising home care services you may not know about

Many older Australian wish to remain living at home for as long as they can. For many, it’s important they remain in their local communities, where they have friends and family nearby, they know their neighbours, and are familiar with the nearby facilities. The familiarity of home can also be reassuring to older people. The feeling of being immersed in a home they’ve created, a reflection of their life journey and rich with memories, can also be hugely comforting. With...
0 comments

Popular Stories

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Caroline Egan
Caroline Egan Feb 19, 2019

Two-hourly repositioning to prevent bedsores is “abuse”, study says

  New research from the University of New South Wales has raised questions about the correct way to care for those requiring pressure area care. The common practice of repositioning every two hours those at risk of developing bedsores may be interrupting their natural sleep rhythms, causing them to become more agitated and distressed, according to the new study. The practice of repositioning also fails to prevent bedsores from developing, the researchers say. The fact that the practice continues is a form...

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Alzheimer's & dementia
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Caroline Egan
Caroline Egan Feb 19, 2019

Sweden’s community-based aged care philosophies take hold world-wide

  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8al3s_96J5Y When Gustav Standell first visited Japan from his native Sweden in 1997, he found nursing homes hidden away in the countryside looking more like hospitals than homes. “There was no privacy and it was impossible to live anything resembling a normal daily life,” he told HelloCare. But Mr Standell knew that the situation had been the same in Sweden up until the 1970s, and the Swedish system had been able to change. Japan’s system...
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Caroline Egan
Caroline Egan Feb 18, 2019

The pub where men living with dementia can meet for a pint

Men who used to enjoy a drink with friends after work every evening, are still able to enjoy a drink at night, even though they are living in a hospital dementia ward. Derwen Ward, part of Cefn Coed Hospital in Wales, opened the Derwen Arms last year, a pub that in many ways is just like any other pub. It serves beer, and has a pool table, and a dart board. The Derwen Arms has been set up to look...
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iStock-831303018

Physical restraint doesn’t protect patients – there are better alternatives

It’s an uncomfortable image to consider: an elderly person – perhaps somebody you know – physically restrained. Maybe an aged care resident deemed likely to fall has been bound to his chair using wrist restraints; or someone with dementia acting aggressively has been confined to her bed by straps and rails. These scenarios remain a reality in Australia. Despite joining the global trend to promote a “restraint free” model, Australia is one of several high income countries continuing to employ...
5 comments
Health care professionals
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Sam Hijazi
Sam Hijazi Feb 18, 2019

“Virtually impossible to make a medication error”: Electronic Charts

The safe and accurate administration of medication is one of the cornerstones of the aged care system. Appropriate systems and strategies for ensuring that the correct medications are given in the prescribed amounts, at the correct times, and to the right people, are a key factor in the trust that residents and their families place in nursing homes. In this day and age, when our lives are becoming increasingly automated in so many ways, it may come as a surprise...
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Jakob Neeland
Jakob Neeland Feb 18, 2019

Mandatory Air-Conditioning in Aged Care No Longer A Priority

There's nothing quite like the Australian summer. Searing temperatures, high winds, and prolonged heat waves can have devastating consequences on our plant life, our animals and even our people. Elderly Australians are particularly vulnerable during the summer months, with issues like heat stroke, dehydration, exhaustion, and heat syncope all being very real possibilities for those who are unable to get cool and stay hydrated. And one of the recommendations that come up over and over again in order to avoid...
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Caroline Egan
Caroline Egan Feb 15, 2019

Two-hourly repositioning disrupts sleep, doesn’t prevent pressure ulcers

There has been a challenge to the conventional belief, held for decades, that those assessed as being at risk of developing pressure sores must be repositioned every two hours. A paper released last week said two-hourly repositioning is a form of “abuse”, because it interrupts the person’s sleep, causing them to be constantly tired, and possibly contributing to them acting out their feelings of frustration. Two-hourly repositioning also doesn’t prevent pressure sores from developing, the paper said. HelloCare published an...
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